• About Me

    Marcia

    I'm a stay-at-home-mom who, as part of a mid-life challenge, decided to run a marathon for kicks. I didn't plan on it becoming a hobby, but it did. I QUALIFIED FOR BOSTON at my second marathon and slipped into the vortex. Join me as I fulfill my dream of running the marathon majors.

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Runbbatical Challenge and a Winner!

Categories: Crosstraining, Runbattical

I hereby proclaim I am taking a Runbbatical. For the first time since fall, 2007, running WILL NOT be my main focus in terms of fitness-related activities. While I’m not hanging up the Mizunos entirely, (oh I’ll still run, just cut back mileage and intensity, you may even find me at another race fun run or 2 this year) ‘official’ training is over until 2011.
I’m turning my attention to other interests. Here’s what I’ll focus on:

Flexibility will I ever (gasp!) be able to touch my toes again?

Road bike while the weather is still nice.

Rekindle the romance with those long neglected weights.

Do more than a half-assed job of hip/glute strengthening to hopefully make my chronic piriformis/buttular fatigue a thing of the past.

And maybe, just maybe manage to not gain any holiday weight?? Please? I know that’s asking a lot.

The plan is to take a physical and psychological break and come back fresher, stronger and hopefully lighter.

Runbbaticalers Unite! 
Those of you not on an official training plan or finishing one soon: please join me! The challenge officially starts on Nov. 1 and runs through the end of the year.
What will you replace (some/most of) your running with?


Virtual Race to Finish Lupus
 Winner #5!
Aimee @ I Tri to Be Me Congrats!
Go here, choose your prize and email me your shipping info.
Note: Road ID, Tarma necklace, and iFitness Belt are taken
More winners to come!
 

Train–Race–Recover–Repeat

Categories: Honey Milk, Marathon Recovery, Muscle Milk, Recoverite

Congrats! You crossed the finish line. Now what? RECOVER!

Keep Moving
This is precisely why so many finishing chutes seem almost as long as the race. It’s important to keep tired muscles from seizing up and allow your body to gradually slow down. So resist the urge to collapse in an inert heap. Medical tent personnel tend to swirl like vultures and you don’t wanna be in there unless absolutely necessary. If you have a long ride home, make sure you make periodic stops to get out and move. Your muscles will thank you in the days to come.

Replenish
As soon as possible after crossing the finish line, start the rehydration process and refuel.  Think carbs, salt, potassium, and protein. Honestly nothing sounds good to me when I finish a race and I’m guilty as charged of grabbing stuff with my kids in mind. But I force myself to have something: sports drink and a protein drink like Muscle Milk, Honey Milk and Recoverite are all great.

Change
Get out of your sweat-soaked running clothes as soon as possible.

Stretch
Use the stick/foam roller, stretch gently. A light massage is good but save the heavy manipulation for another time. I also like to relax with my legs against a wall and let the blood circulate out of my legs and toward the heart.

Cool Down
Get in that ice bath or cool shower to ease sore muscles and reduce inflammation.

Compression socks are the bomb
I put mine on as soon as possible and have been known to sleep in them. They reduce leg muscle fatigue/cramps by enhancing circulation and help prevent blood from pooling in the legs.

The Following Week:
Sleep
6 to 8 hours are good, 7 to 9 are even better. I’m almost 2 weeks post marathon and I’m still sleeping like a log!

Soreness
Feeling sore for 2-4 days is completely normal but not mandatory. I was most sore (going down stairs was a total treat…not, I mastered the ‘plop’ to a sitting position, walked hunched over, etc.) after my first marathon. I’ve been significantly less sore and recovered much faster from subsequent ones so don’t be discouraged.

Cross Train
Biking, walking, swimming, strength training and balance work are all excellent activities during recovery. Although you’ve earned a slothful stint in front of the TV, you don’t necessarily have to take it.

Eat well
Not a ton, just the kinds of foods that promote recovery: fruits/veggies/protein etc. The week after a marathon IS NOT the time to start a weight loss diet. Antioxidant-rich foods are your friend. You just put the ‘ole bod through an intense amount of stress and your immune system may be compromised.

Remember your body takes a full 6 to 8 weeks to recover fully so go easy on yourself.

Do you have any recovery tips to share?
 
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